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2 edition of Regeneration of lateral line neuromasts in ambystoma mexicanum found in the catalog.

Regeneration of lateral line neuromasts in ambystoma mexicanum

Shelley Helen Waldorf

Regeneration of lateral line neuromasts in ambystoma mexicanum

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Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, Dept of Zoology and Comparative Physiology, 1984.

Statementby Shelley Helen Waldorf.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13825198M

The mechanosensory lateral line of fish is a hair cell based sensory system that detects water motion using canal and superficial neuromasts. The trunk lateral line of the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, only has superficial posterior lateral line nerve (PLLn) therefore innervates trunk superficial neuromasts exclusively and provides the opportunity to investigate.   pattern metamorphosis in the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum. Journal of Morphology – PMID: 8. Parichy DM, Stigson M, Voss SR. Genetic analysis of steel and the PG-M/versican-encoding gene AxPG as candidate genes for the white (d) pigmentation mutant in the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum.


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Regeneration of lateral line neuromasts in ambystoma mexicanum by Shelley Helen Waldorf Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fins also contain a neural structure, the so-called lateral line, which allows the fish to detect unidirectional or oscillatory water flow. The lateral line is composed of individual mechano-sensory organs, or neuromasts, which are arrayed in a regular pattern along the surface of the body and fins (Metcalfe et al.,Itoh and Chitnis, ).Cited by: Replacement of lateral line sensory organs during tail regeneration in salamanders: identification of progenitor cells and analysis of leukocyte activity.

Jones JE(1), Corwin JT. Author information: (1)Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Cited by: The lateral line axon is an essential part of the peripheral nerve system in zebrafish that innervates the lateral line neuromasts.

In addition to hair cell regeneration, we found that SW treatment significantly promoted the regeneration of laser-damaged lateral line axons (Fig.

6a).Cited by: 4. Salamanders have great potential to regenerate damaged organs upon injury, and thus provide an important model for understanding the mechanisms of tissue regeneration; however, genetic studies have been limited due to a lack of gene knockin strategies.

In this study, we have established efficient CRISPR/Cas9 mediated gene knockin approaches in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Cited by:   New lateral line organs (neuromasts) are formed in regenerating tails of the larvae of a urodele, the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), even in the absence of the lateral line nerve, as confirmed by electron microscopic examination.

The non-innervated organs are similar to normal innervated organs. The hair cells are polarized in opposite directions, and despite the lack of nerve Cited by: Other articles where Neuromast is discussed: lateral line system: a series of mechanoreceptors called neuromasts (lateral line organs) arranged in an interconnected network along the head and body.

This network is typically arranged in rows; however, neuromasts may also be organized singly. At its simplest, rows of neuromasts appear on the surface of the skin; however, for most fishes.

It has been proposed that supporting cells may be the progenitors of regenerated hair cells that contribute to recovery of hearing in birds, but regeneration is difficult to visualize in the ear, because it occurs deep in the skull.

Hair cells and supporting cells that are comparable to those in the ear are present in lateral line neuromasts, and in axolotl salamanders these cells are. The lateral line organs in the skin of fish and aquatic amphibians also contain hair cells and have long been known to be replaceable through regeneration.

Recently, it was discovered that after acoustic trauma or antibiotic poisoning, injured hair cells in the mature auditory organs of birds also could be replaced through regeneration.

Efficient gene knockin in axolotl and its use to test the role of satellite cells in limb regeneration Ji-Feng Feia,b,c,1, Maritta Schueza, Dunja Knappa, Yuka Taniguchia,b, David N.

Drechselb,d, and Elly M. Tanakaa,b,1 aDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; bResearch. The lateral line axon is an essential part of the peripheral nerve system in zebrafish that innervates the lateral line neuromasts.

In addition to hair cell regeneration, we found that SW treatment significantly promoted the regeneration of laser-damaged lateral line axons (Fig.

6a). Fate-mapping studies in the axolotl (salamander) Ambystoma mexicanum (Northcutt et al. ) and the paddlefish Polyodon spathula (Modrell et al. a) have conclusively demonstrated that both neuromasts and ampullary organs develop from lateral line placodes (i.e.

thickened patches of cranial ectoderm) in these species, strongly supporting. the axolotl salamander Ambystoma mexicanum as a model to investigate what cell lineages lead to the production of sensory hair cells during regeneration.

The mechanoreceptive sensory epithelia of the lateral line are punctate collections of sensory hair cells and supporting called neuromasts. Margaret R. Wright, Regeneration and degeneration experiments on lateral line nerves and sense organs in anurans, Journal of Experimental Zoology,2, (), ().

Wiley Online Library Carl Caskey Speidel, Correlated studies of sense organs and nerves of the lateral‐line in living frog tadpoles. Introduction. The lateral line (LL) system is a mechanosensory organ found in both fish and amphibians that is responsible for hearing, balance, rheotaxis and mediating behaviors such as schooling and predator avoidance It is composed of clusters of hair cells surrounded by supporting cells, both of which are positioned in structures called neuromasts 6.

J. Ultrast. Res. 15, Jorgensen, J.M. and Flock, A. () The ultrastructure of lateral line sense organs in the adult salamander Ambystoma mexicanum. Neurocytol. 2, Jorgensen, J.M. and Flock, A.

() Non-innervated sense organs of the lateral line: development in the regenerating tail of the sala- mander Ambystoma mexicanum. In order to determine the time window for induction of lateral line placodes in the axolotl, we performed two series of heterotopic and isochronic transplantations from pigmented to albino embryos at different stages of embryogenesis and assessed the distribution of pigmented neuromasts.

The lateral line system of anamniote vertebrates enables the detection of local water movement and weak bioelectric fields. Ancestrally, it comprises neuromasts – small sense organs containing. Axolotls, Ambystoma mexicanum, Msx-2, and Msx-1 in the lateral line neuromasts stand out.

ported that during regeneration in response to laser abla. In aquatic amphibians, removal of a patch of skin that contains lateral line neuromast organs evokes the production of new neuromasts that differentiate in the approximate location of the organs that were lost.

The whole process can be completed in less than 2 weeks, with the number of replacement neuromasts roughly matching the number lost. The transcription co-factor gene Eya4, which we had previously shown to be specifically expressed in lateral line (and otic) placodes, neuromasts and ampullary organs in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula (O'Neill et al., ), similarly proved to be expressed in lateral line (and otic) placodes, neuromasts and ampullary organs in the paddlefish.

New lateral organs (neuromasts) are formed in regenerating tails of the larvae of a urodele, the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), even in the absence of the lateral line nerve, as confirmed by electron microscopic examination.

The non-innervated organs are similar to normal innervated organs. The signals that initiate lateral line placode migration are not well understood. Heterochronic transplantation studies performed by Stone in the spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum (Ambystoma.

The sensory organs of the zebrafish lateral‐line system (neuromasts) originate from migrating primordia that move along precise pathways. The posterior primordium, which deposits the neuromasts on the body and tail of the embryo, migrates along the horizontal myoseptum from the. Later, in studies of the salamander (Ambystoma punctatum) Stone () demonstrated that the posterior lateral line ganglion cells and the primordial cells that form neuromasts both arise from a common postotic placode.

Cells in the rostra1 part of the placode become the sensory neurons, and cells in the caudal part form the migratory primordium.

Morphological diversity of the lateral line canal system is defined by (1) variation in the morphology and extent of development of the cranial lateral line canals; (2) the number, placement, and extent of development of the trunk canals; and (3) the distribution of superficial neuromasts on the skin of the head, trunk, and tail.

Abstract. The aim of this paper is to assemble a significant amount of information on Ambystoma mexicanum, the axolotl salamander, to assist in the basic knowledge needed to raise, breed, and study most aspects of axolotl is important to understand the basic biology of the axolotl in order to make informed decisions on their proper care and use in experiments.

the lateral line system are also able to regenerate (Balak et al. The axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is a species of mole salamander that exhibits paedomorphosis, remaining in its aquatic larval form its entire life, making it a particularly interesting model for sensory development and regeneration (Shaffer ).

Ambystoma mexicanum, an aquatic salamander, is a species protected under the Mexican UMA (Unit for Management and conservation of wildlife) as of April Another detrimental factor is that the axolotl lost their role as a top predator since the introduction of locally exotic species such as.

New lateral organs (neuromasts) are formed in regenerating tails of the larvae of a urodele, the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), even in the absence of the lateral line nerve, as confirmed by. Abstract. The Ambystoma mexicanum, commonly known as the axolotl, possesses extraordinary regenerative abilities and is capable of reconstituting limbs, retina, liver, and even minor regions of the brain (Muneoka et al., ).At the most elementary level, regeneration is mediated by a cascade of epigenetic processes.

With the aid of recent advances in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), a study. John B. Armstrong's 46 research works with citations and reads, including: On the Origin of the Mesoderm in the Mexican Axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum. The lateral line system is an unique sensory system found in fishes and amphibians.

It is composed of two types of sensory organs: electroreceptors (ampullary organs) and mechanoreceptors (neuromasts).

Fig. 2 In the majority of non-cartilaginous vertebrates, the posterior lateral line placodes migrate and deposit lateral line sense organs. (A) The posterior lateral line placode often splits into a dorsal and a ventral component, as seen in the mudpuppy Necturus (an aquatic salamander) (reproduced from Platt, ).

(B) Fusion of the trunk of a lightly pigmented frog embryo (Rana palustris. Among vertebrates, urodele amphibians, such as the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), display a unique and extensive ability for adult ls can replace a wide variety of tissues and complex structures including muscle, cartilage, skin, spinal cord, brain, heart, jaw, and limbs.

6 The axolotl’s nearest relatives, anuran frogs and reptiles, lose the ability to reform tissues after. Lateral Line System cells during regeneration have been investigated by using 2 different procedures to ablate preexisting hair cells in in- dividual neuromast sensory epithelia of the lateral line in the tails of salamanders, then monitoring the responses of sur- Ambystoma mexicanum, of the “white”.

Survey of the reproductive capacities of three separate age groups of wild-type Ambystoma mexicanum (Dutch strain) pp Book advertisement:"The brain of the Tiger Salamander Ambystoma tigrinum" (Univ. of Chicago Press,) The lateral line system of the axolotl: pp Northcutt. Regeneration of limb joints in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

[Jangwoo Lee, David M Gardiner] An understanding of the process and mechanisms of joint regeneration in this model system for tetrapod limb regeneration would provide insights into developing novel therapies for inducing joint regeneration in humans.

To this end, we have used. The lateral line system of the teleost zebrafish is a widely used model for hair cell development and also regeneration, as well as neuromasts and lateral line afferent neurons the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum) (Northcutt et al.

), and vital dye (DiI)-labeling experiments in an actinopterygian (a chondrostean. * Book announcement: Developmental Biology of the Axolotl. Table of Contents Is Spring * IU Axolotl Colony update by Susan T. Duhon * The lateral line system of the axolotl by R.

Glenn Northcutt * Taste system in the axolotl: physiology and anatomy by Takatoshi Nagai. Animals. All of the experiments in this study were performed on small to medium-sized Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) measuring approximately cm from snout to tail tip ( cm snout to vent) either spawned at UC, Irvine or obtained from the Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center, University of s were anesthetized using a % solution of MS (Ethyl 3.

Takeuchi H, Namba H () Feeding behavior and lateral line system in axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. II. Effects of blocking the mechanosensory lateral line system by cobalt ions. Zool Sci – Google Scholar.Fig. Measurements and body parts of a larval salamander, (a) Lateral (upper) and ventral (lower) views of a typical Ambystoma salamander larvae, drawing by D.

Karges; (b) dorsal view of the head and anterior body region of a hatchling Ambystoma maculatum, photograph by .Gain-of-function assays in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) to identify signaling pathways that induce and regulate limb regeneration.

Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.). PMID DOI: /_ 1: